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Just English: AROUND THE WORLD IN 80 DAYS: PLOT SUMMARY

The main character, Phileas Fogg is introduced as unusually preoccupied with punctuality. He plans every bit of every day and has, thus, never deviated from this schedule as far as anyone can tell. At the point where we meet Fogg, he is in need of a new servant; his last one made the grave mistake of bringing him shaving water that was eighty-four degrees, rather than the specified eighty-six. Fogg's new servant, Jean Passepartout, arrives at his home precisely twenty-two minutes after eleven on the first day. Jean is quite pleased with his master and his new station, because he wishes to settle down and he has heard that Fogg rarely travels. Fogg tells Passepartout to settle in and then sets out for his gentleman's club at the same exact time that he does every day.

At the Reform Club, Fogg and his friends discuss a recent bank robbery and the „The Daily Telegraph ‟ says that the robber is a gentleman. Rewards are offered and when the friends wonder where the thief could have gone, Fogg declares that it is possible to go around the world in eighty days. He bets twenty thousand pounds against anyone that he will make the tour of the world in eighty days or less. Fogg decides to take the train to Dover that very evening and tells his challengers that he would be back in the Reform Club, on Saturday, the 21 st of December.

Fogg tells Passerpartout that they shall be travelling light. Passepartout packs the modest carpetbag, containing the wardrobes of his master and himself. Fogg carries two timetables showing the arrival and departure of steamers and trains. Passepartout is told to take care of the carpetbag which contains Fogg ‟ s twenty thousand pounds. Two first class tickets for Paris are bought and both men are off on their journey.

Two men await the arrival of the steamer, the Mongolia – one of them being Detective Fix, who had been dispatched from England in search of the bank robber. It was his responsibility to look out for all suspicious looking people. Passepartout comes up to him and politely asks if he could point out the English consulate, at the same time showing Fogg ‟ s passport which he wishes to validate. Fix insists that the description of Fogg in the passport is identical with that of the bank robber, which he had received from Scotland Yard. Instantly, Fix sends a telegram to London stating that Fogg is the bank robber and a warrant of arrest be sent to Bombay.

Fix and Passepartout strike a friendship and Fix gains more knowledge of Phileas Fogg. They arrive earlier in Bombay and both the master and butler have tickets for the great railway that will take them to Calcutta. Unfortunately, Passepartout enters a temple that does not allow foreigners. The warrant for the arrest of Fogg does not arrive .The Indian police say that the matter is in the hands of the London office.

The train they are on stops suddenly as the railroad is not finished and the travellers will have to find their own way. Fogg buys an elephant,Kiouni, for two thousand pounds and finds a young guide called Ali to take them on their journey.

The elephant takes them on its back through the forest when suddenly they meet a group of bandits who have kidnapped the daughter of a wealthy merchant. They decide to save the kidnapped Aouda by breaking down the walls of the hut where she has been kept.

Phileas Fogg presents Ali with Kiouni, the elephant. On a train to Benares, Aouda wakes up and thanks the men for saving her. Fogg reassures her and offers to take her with them to Hong Kong to look for her relative.

Just as they are about to board the Hong Kong steamer, Passepartout is arrested and taken to stand before a judge on the charge of illegally entering a temple with foot wear. Phileas Fogg pays a large amount of money for the bail and for the cost of not going into jail. Passepartout is very upset with the fact that his master has to pay such a large sum of money on his behalf. They immediately board Rangoon. the ship that was to leave for Hong Kong. Detective Fix is very angry because of Fogg ‟ s excessive spending. Fix is worried that by the time the journey ends and Fogg is caught, there will be very little money left as his reward.

Passepartout begins to wonder on the coincidence of Detective Fix being on the same journey as his master and questions him. Their journey on the Rangoon towards Hong Kong is not too smooth. The weather is rough and the steamer reaches Hong Kong a day later. A pilot informs Fogg that the Carnatic would leave Hong Kong for Yokohama and Fogg is pleased as he had thought that he had missed the ship. Aouda ‟ s relative is not in Hong Kong anymore and it is decided that she will accompany Fogg to Europe.

Fix decides to tell Passepartout the secret of his mission and offers him a drink. Fix explains to Passepartout his real purpose as a detective and Passepartout is shocked. The loyal butler does not believe a word Fix says and is upset. Someone comes along and knocks Passepartout out. Fix is happy because he assumes that Fogg will miss the Carnatic. But Fogg hires the Tankadere to get them to Shanghai to meet the Carnatic. They are once again on course.

Passepartout had managed to board the Carnatic despite being hit in the head. He goes looking for Fogg on the ship but does not find either his master or Aouda. He is very angry with Fix for acting so deceitfully. Passepartout reaches Yokohama on the 13 th and is both penniless and hungry. He trades his clothes for the Japanese attire and joins an acrobatic troupe. While performing the human pyramid, he tumbles and sees his master and Aouda. They leave after paying the theatre manager some compensation and are on their way to America.

Fogg, Aouda and Passepartout sail in the General Grant from Yokohama to San Francisco. Fix is aboard the ship but hides away from Passepartout. He is frustrated that he does not have the warrant to arrest Fogg. When he finally meets Passepartout, he explains that only in England can it be decided whether Fogg is guilty or not. They both decide to be allies and Passepartout warns Fix not to be treacherous. They buy train tickets to New York but as the train approaches the Rocky Mountains, it stops because a bridge is „out ‟ and there is no way to cross it. But a man called Colonel Proctor suggests that the train move at full speed and they could go across before the bridge falls apart completely. They cross the river in seconds just as the bridge falls behind them.

As the train moves along its course, it is suddenly attacked by a band of outlaws. They swarm the carriages and fight with the passengers. The conductor, who is attacked, cries that if the train is not stopped, it will surely crash. Passepartout hears this too and manages to slip under the train carriages. He removes the safety chains and a violent jolt separates the train and the engine. The train comes to a standstill near Kearney Fort station. The soldiers of the fort hear the firing and rush to help. The outlaws run away. But when the passengers are counted on the station platform, it is found that several are missing, including Passepartout. Fogg goes with the soldiers to save him, but, they miss the train to New York. Fix helps to get a sled to New York. However, they miss the steamer, The China, to Liverpool.

With nine days to go, Fogg pays Anthony Speedy, the captain of Henrietta. to take them to Bordeaux but instead convinces the crew to take them to Liverpool. Fix is upset with Fogg ‟ s generous ways and Passepartout is uneasy knowing that his master is spending a lot of money just to make it back to London on time. They encounter both bad weather and a lack of coal but in the end, land in Liverpool, only to be arrested by Fix.

Fogg is jailed and he has only nine hours left to return to the Reform Club to win his bet. Fix rushes in to apologise that the real robber has been arrested. Fogg is released. He returns to London on a special train but he thinks he is five minutes late and has lost the bet.

Fogg, Aouda and Passepartout return to the house in Savile Row. Fogg is calm although he has spent most of his fortune. Aouda asks Fogg whether he would like to have her as his wife. He confesses his own love for her. Passepartout is instructed to make their wedding arrangements on the following day, Monday.

When he goes to meet the Reverend, he realizes that the marriage cannot take place the next day, because it is still a Sunday. It is not a Monday, as Fogg, Aouda and Passepartout think. Passepartout runs to inform his master and they realise that they have gained time while travelling eastward. In reality, they have reached London twenty four hours earlier. Fogg manages to reach the Club at the stipulated time. In the end, Fogg not only won the bet but also a charming wife.

Taken from. The Teacher’s Literature Component Teaching Module,Curriculum Development Division. Ministry of Education Malaysia 2011

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Around The World In 80 Days

Around The World In 80 Days Continue reading.


Type of Literary Work

This sensational novel is an adventure novel consisting of an enterprising Englishman touring the globe. Woven within are historical facts, such as the British Empire and colonies around the globe, as well as historically accurate locations.

The theme of this breathtaking novel is one of daring and persistence. On the whim of a wager. Fogg is sent around the world in the impossible time span of eighty days. Throughout the work, Fogg’s limitless persistence, entwined with his stereotypical English composure, astound the reader.
Fogg represents this boundless daring in the audacious wager he makes. He has promised his arrival back in London in eighty days, regardless of the wilderness, delay, or other problems that may arise on his journey. The reader is, perhaps, driven to the conclusion that Fogg is a madman, who takes lightly to large sums of money. This is not so, as Fogg (although the wager seems unfeasible) is a reserved man, calm and collected at all times atop the punctuality Verne expresses within him in just the first chapters.
Verne expresses the stereotypical Englishmen, the seeker of adventure, popular in his time. Almost jokingly does Verne come to this conclusion, he being a Frenchman, in which all Englishmen will go to the corners of the Earth to find an area to “Europeanize”, find a wild beast to market from, or a project to throw their pounds at.
Fogg’s endless persistence, is further shown in his composure while great delays push him back, tragedies occur around him, and loved ones are lost repeatedly. His endless hope was a flood during a great drought within the circumstances he was found in. Train delays were compensated through elephant purchases, steamer delays through chartering yachts, stubborn foreigners subdued through a handful of bank notes – even the weather seemed to fall before Fogg. His devotion to his ultimate goal, not that of the money but of the accomplishment, was infinitely expressed throughout the work.

The setting for this novel was a constantly shifting one. Taking place during what seems to be the Late Industrial Revolution and the high of the British Empire. the era is portrayed amongst influential Englishmen, the value of the pound, the presence of steamers, railroads, ferries, and a European globe.
The novel begins in London, but quickly changes eastward, from Paris, to Suez, Bombay, Calcutta, Singapore, Yokohama, San Francisco, Omaha, New York, Queenstown, Liverpool, and back to London – a complete circumnavigation around the glove condensed into two hundred-odd pages.

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Within these locales, the area is constantly in transportation areas, that is to say, railroad stations, quays, and carriages.

Basic Plot
Around the World in Eighty Days begins in the Reform Club in London, where whist players of different disciplines have challenged the news of a circumnavigation conquered in eighty days. Phileas Fogg, a daring individual, wagers with his comrades he can accomplish the trip in that specified time regardless of delay, bad weather, or other incidents and accidents. His fellow players, astounded at Fogg’s brazen gamble, offer twenty thousand pounds to the winner, Fogg, or those at the Club. And thus, the incredible journey begins.
Fogg returns to his home on Saville Row, where he asks his newly appointed servant to pack his essentials and prepare to voyage to France. Fogg, the punctual Englishman, tallies his gains and losses within a journal as the trip continues. The two voyagers arrive in Paris, and just as swiftly depart to Marseilles. There, hastily again, they steam to Suez.
While in Suez, a certain Mr. Fix, an English detective, is on the wait for a warrant for the arrest of a bank robber. The supposed criminal is described exactly as Fogg’s persona, and Fix is determined to arrest this eccentric man before he leaves English lands. Just as the detective feels ready for an arrest, the servant and Fogg depart on the Mongolia on way to Bombay. The detective follows with determination, after leaving word to forward the warrant to Bombay.
The three travel to Bombay, where they spend a trivial amount of time. While here, Passepartout is sent on errands to purchase more essentials. In his curiosity, he ventures within an Indian temples, with his shoes on. Entering within such a temple as Passepartout did is regarded as a crime by the English government, who respects the beliefs of the natives. The priests run him out, and Passepartout is lucky to escape on a train with his master on way to Calcutta. The headlines which were produced on English newspapers months ago were proven false. This is to say, the Bombay-Calcutta railroad was not truthfully finished. Mr. Fogg’s voyage was cut abruptly at the end of the railroad track. The passengers would have to travel the missing piece of the railroad by foot, a great delay to Phileas Fogg. Fogg showed no emotion at this, and instead, searched about and purchased an elephant and hired a guide. The adventure that would follow would imprint on Fogg a tinge of emotion in two month’s time.
On way to Calcutta, through the jungles and on an elephant, the party encounters a fanatical bunch of native Indians carrying an abducted princess, so the Parsee guide tells them. Fogg wastes no time in telling his companions they must not delay and rescue the girl, regardless how much time he might lose and the wager with it. The party awaits the morning, when Passepartout rescues the girl from the platform where the fanatics were going to burn her. They race away from the firing muskets and swinging sabres towards Calcutta, where yet another incident awaits them.
At Calcutta, two English policemen have Fogg follow them to a makeshift courtroom. There, Fogg and Passepartout are accused of neglecting native Indian rules of the temple and are sentences to a week in jail. Fogg pays bail and they leave, almost missing the Rangoon, the steamer that is to take them to Hong Kong.
Amid stormy seas, and gale winds, the steamer arrives at Singapore and continued towards Hong Kong, where Fix plans to make an arrest of Fogg. When the steamer arrives at Hong Kong, and the warrant has not arrived, Fix decides to act boldly. He invites Passepartout to a drink within a Hong Kong bar. After drinking heavily, and inhaling opium fumes, Passepartout passes out, delaying Mr. Fogg. Unable to miss the steamer bound for Yokohama, Fogg continues without Passepartout, unaware the steamer changed schedules and left hours prior to his arrival. He hires the Tankadere, to take him to Shanghai to catch the steamer he missed, while Passepartout is lost in China.
Fogg makes it to Japan after catching the steamer in Shanghai and finds Passepartout in a circus, after he desperately tries to find a job to pay for a meal. They continue to America on the Carnatic, much to the dismay of Fix. The detective now promises to help Fogg to return to England as quickly as possible, in order to arrest him. The trip to San Francisco goes serenely.
At San Francisco, the party continues via the newly opened transcontinental railroad towards New York. On the eleven day trip, the party experiences delays of snow, blocked tracks, and even a ruined bridge. It is the delay at Fort Saunders that is the greatest delay to Fogg. Attacked by Indians while in the train, the party and the passengers are forced to defend themselves against the savages. Passepartout, the brave former acrobat, goes under the train and to the locomotive, where he disconnects the engine from the rest of the train. Thus slowing the train, the travelers fend off the Indians, taking no fatalities, but several seriously wounded. When the dust clears, three travelers are missing, among them Passepartout.
After Passepartout’s disappearance is discovered, Fogg pleads with the brigade stationed at the Fort to assist him in recovering the prisoners from the Sioux. After negotiating, the brigade chief allows half his men to go with Fogg. Two days elapse, and after a fierce battle with the Indians, Fogg returns with Passepartout. However, the train has left since then, and the party is stranded a quarter of the way still from New York. A fellow passenger who stayed at the Fort, suggests to Fogg he can take them from their location to Chicago, where an express train could be taken to New York. Fogg agrees, and the party is taken on a sled ride at forty miles per hour to Chicago.
At Chicago, Fogg hires an express train made of seven locomotives to go to New York as quickly as possible. On arriving at New York, the party discovers the China has left forty five minutes prior. Out of desperation, Fogg hires a merchant ship, the Henrietta, to take him to Bordeaux, instead of Liverpool. The rugged and rude captain, Captain Speedy, is, instead, taken prisoner by his crew and Fogg, who makes himself captain. Steaming as quickly as possible now to Liverpool, another problem arises – the ship will run out of coal two days before reaching Liverpool. Fogg thinks this matter through, and purchases the ship from Captain Speedy for sixty thousand dollars. Fogg changes his destination from Liverpool to Queenstown, where he can catch an express mail train direct to London. Still low on coal, Fogg suggests the wooden half of the ship be chopped and burned. The ship was destroyed and left as an iron skeleton, and enters Queenstown within the day. There, yet another problem arises.
On landing again on English soil, Fogg is arrested by Fix, who had been following them since Suez. Fogg is detained at a prison, and transported to London, but is delayed two days. On the second day, Fix tells Fogg he mistakenly arrested him, and the true criminal was arrested three days prior. At this news, Fogg knocks out Fix, and heads to his home, too late to win his wager. There, he expresses his true feelings for Aouda, the Indian princess, and plan to marry her. He sends Passepartout to fetch a Reverend to marry them and prepares to live in ruin.
When Passepartout reaches the Reverend’s home, he finds no one, realizing the day must be Saturday, not Sunday! He runs to Fogg and informs him of his mistake, and both return to the Reform Club. There, Fogg surprises his fellow whist players by being on time, and thus, winning the bet agreed upon three months before.

Major Characters
Phileas Fogg – A rich Englishman, he is the main character of the novel. Determined in all his mind to conquer the trip around the world in eighty days, his effort is commendable. Portrayed as a punctual and gentle man with a greatly controlled composure, he helps those around him on the trip regardless of the delays to winning the wager. Saving a persecuted princess in India, his servant several times, and bringing the detective who would eventually arrest him home, the man was truthfully a good soul with a blank face. Regardless how many delays encountered the man, or incidents and obstacles that stood in his path, he would not lose sight of his goal and the possibility of his touring the globe in such a time. Honestly, a very lucky man, who was very sure of his abilities.
Jean Passepartout – The devote servant, he followed Fogg in his tour around the globe. Initially searching for a master who would keep in one locale, and living in peace for his time of service there, he changes into thinking this trip exceptionally bold and exciting. Jean Passepartout was the first to realize Fix’s true intentions around Fogg, and from that point on, behaves much like a bodyguard to Fogg, ignorant of Fix’s ignoble plan. Passepartout plays an important role of relief within the novel, essentially, the outspoken Phileas Fogg, the Englishman who spoke so rarely.

Characters likes most or least
Of the characters within this selection, I enjoyed Fogg the most. His personality was incredibly interesting. The stereotypical design Verne implements into him is curiously entertaining. His punctuality, his blunt beliefs in his goal, and his general demeanor are very eccentric and appealing. The determination Fogg places in the conquering of this challenge is inscrutable, while his reasons for doing so are paradoxically frank.

Personal Evaluation
I greatly enjoyed reading this book. The adventure and suspense both intertwined with the historical background of the Industrial Revolution years is very enjoyable and highly entertaining. Verne’s style is unique and exciting, especially in this work.
I would highly recommend this book to someone else, and would pick it up another time in haste. I would also hesitate in changing the contents.

Around the World in 80 Days Essay

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Around The World In 80 Days
Around the World in Eighty Days” Jules Verne William Butcher Aerie Books LTD. 210, n/a Reviewed by Yitty Long In the book “Around the World in Eighty Days,” Phileas Fogg.

Type of Literary Work

This sensational novel is an adventure novel consisting of an enterprising Englishman touring the globe. Woven within are historical facts, such as the British Empire and colonies around the globe, as well as historically accurate locations.

The theme of this breathtaking novel is one of daring and persistence. On the whim of a wager, Fogg is sent around the world in the impossible time span of eighty days. Throughout the work, Fogg�s

Around the World in 80 Days
Type of Literary Work This sensational novel is an adventure novel consisting of an enterprising Englishman touring the globe. Woven within are historical facts, such as the.

limitless persistence, entwined with his stereotypical English composure, astound the reader.

Fogg represents this boundless daring in the audacious wager he makes. He has promised his arrival back in London in eighty days, regardless of the wilderness, delay, or other problems that may arise on his journey. The reader is, perhaps, driven to the conclusion that Fogg is a madman, who takes lightly to large sums of money. This is not so, as Fogg (although the wager seems unfeasible) is

Around the World in 80 Days
Type of Literary Work This sensational novel is an adventure novel consisting of an enterprising Englishman touring the globe. Woven within are historical facts, such as the British Empire and.

a reserved man, calm and collected at all times atop the punctuality Verne expresses within him in just the first chapters.

Verne expresses the stereotypical Englishmen, the seeker of adventure, popular in his time. Almost jokingly does Verne come to this conclusion, he being a Frenchman, in which all Englishmen will go to the corners of the Earth to find an area to "Europeanize", find a wild beast to market from, or a project to throw their pounds at.

Around the World in 80 Days
"Around the World in Eighty Days" By: Jules Verne Adventure Novel Theme: The themes of this novel are calmness and persistence. These two themes are exemplified by one character, Mr.

Fogg�s endless persistence, is further shown in his composure while great delays push him back, tragedies occur around him, and loved ones are lost repeatedly. His endless hope was a flood during a great drought within the circumstances he was found in. Train delays were compensated through elephant purchases, steamer delays through chartering yachts, stubborn foreigners subdued through a handful of bank notes � even the weather seemed to fall before Fogg. His devotion to his ultimate goal, not that

Around The World In 80 Days
Type of Literary Work This sensational novel is an adventure novel consisting of an enterprising Englishman touring the globe. Woven within are historical facts, such as the British Empire and.

of the money but of the accomplishment, was infinitely expressed throughout the work.

The setting for this novel was a constantly shifting one. Taking place during what seems to be the Late Industrial Revolution and the high of the British Empire, the era is portrayed amongst influential Englishmen, the value of the pound, the presence of steamers, railroads, ferries, and a European globe.

The novel begins in London, but quickly changes eastward, from Paris, to Suez,

Around the world in 80 days--BR
Around the World in Eighty Days is a classic novel by Jules Verne about an English gentleman by the name of Phileas Fogg. Fogg was quite an unusual and.

Bombay, Calcutta, Singapore, Yokohama, San Francisco, Omaha, New York, Queenstown, Liverpool, and back to London � a complete circumnavigation around the glove condensed into two hundred-odd pages. Within these locales, the area is constantly in transportation areas, that is to say, railroad stations, quays, and carriages.

Around the World in Eighty Days begins in the Reform Club in London, where whist players of different disciplines have challenged the news of a circumnavigation conquered in eighty days. Phileas

Around The World In 80 Days--Br
Around the World in Eighty Days is a classic novel by Jules Verne about an English gentleman by the name of Phileas Fogg. Fogg was quite an unusual and mysterious.

Fogg, a daring individual, wagers with his comrades he can accomplish the trip in that specified time regardless of delay, bad weather, or other incidents and accidents. His fellow players, astounded at Fogg�s brazen gamble, offer twenty thousand pounds to the winner, Fogg, or those at the Club. And thus, the incredible journey begins.

Fogg returns to his home on Saville Row, where he asks his newly appointed servant to pack his essentials and prepare to voyage to France. Fogg,

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the punctual Englishman, tallies his gains and losses within a journal as the trip continues. The two voyagers arrive in Paris, and just as swiftly depart to Marseilles. There, hastily again, they steam to Suez.

While in Suez, a certain Mr. Fix, an English detective, is on the wait for a warrant for the arrest of a bank robber. The supposed criminal is described exactly as Fogg�s persona, and Fix is determined to arrest this eccentric man before he leaves

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English lands. Just as the detective feels ready for an arrest, the servant and Fogg depart on the Mongolia on way to Bombay. The detective follows with determination, after leaving word to forward the warrant to Bombay.

The three travel to Bombay, where they spend a trivial amount of time. While here, Passepartout is sent on errands to purchase more essentials. In his curiosity, he ventures within an Indian temples, with his shoes on. Entering within such a temple

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as Passepartout did is regarded as a crime by the English government, who respects the beliefs of the natives. The priests run him out, and Passepartout is lucky to escape on a train with his master on way to Calcutta. The headlines which were produced on English newspapers months ago were proven false. This is to say, the Bombay-Calcutta railroad was not truthfully finished. Mr. Fogg�s voyage was cut abruptly at the end of the railroad track. The passengers would

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have to travel the missing piece of the railroad by foot, a great delay to Phileas Fogg. Fogg showed no emotion at this, and instead, searched about and purchased an elephant and hired a guide. The adventure that would follow would imprint on Fogg a tinge of emotion in two month�s time.

On way to Calcutta, through the jungles and on an elephant, the party encounters a fanatical bunch of native Indians carrying an abducted princess, so the Parsee guide

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tells them. Fogg wastes no time in telling his companions they must not delay and rescue the girl, regardless how much time he might lose and the wager with it. The party awaits the morning, when Passepartout rescues the girl from the platform where the fanatics were going to burn her. They race away from the firing muskets and swinging sabres towards Calcutta, where yet another incident awaits them.

At Calcutta, two English policemen have Fogg follow them to a

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makeshift courtroom. There, Fogg and Passepartout are accused of neglecting native Indian rules of the temple and are sentences to a week in jail. Fogg pays bail and they leave, almost missing the Rangoon, the steamer that is to take them to Hong Kong.

Amid stormy seas, and gale winds, the steamer arrives at Singapore and continued towards Hong Kong, where Fix plans to make an arrest of Fogg. When the steamer arrives at Hong Kong, and the warrant

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has not arrived, Fix decides to act boldly. He invites Passepartout to a drink within a Hong Kong bar. After drinking heavily, and inhaling opium fumes, Passepartout passes

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